Month: October 2016

Sister’s Fund Offers Prescription Aid for St. Anthony Hospital Patient

 

Sister’s Fund pic
Sister’s Fund
Image: givetosaints.com

Duke Ligon founded Mekusukey Oil Company in 1970 and led the Oklahoma City company to become one of the largest private mineral owners in the country with more than 79,000 net minerals across more than 450 countries. Beyond his professional obligations, Duke Ligon serves as a member of the board of directors for the St. Anthony Foundation. The St. Anthony Foundation maintains several projects, including the Sister’s Fund.

The Sister’s Fund supports patients of St. Anthony Hospital and provides free prescription medication services to individuals receiving healthcare from the hospital. Donations to the fund help patients experiencing financial difficulties that prevent them from affording essential prescription medication. In addition, the fund offers short-term aid by connecting patients with other community resources.

Donors can choose to send one-time monetary gifts of any amount they choose or set up monthly gifts by selecting the Sister’s Fund as the gift designation on the online donation page. The minimum amount to fund a prescription for a needy patient is $20.

For more information about the Sister’s Fund and other St. Anthony Foundation projects, visit www.givetosaints.com/sisters-fund.

Advertisements

The Destabilizing Force of the 1973 Oil Embargo

1973 Oil Embargo pic
1973 Oil Embargo
Image: npr.org

Oklahoma City, Oklahoma-based energy executive and attorney Duke Ligon has built up a distinguished career as counsel, founder, or board member of a wide range of oil and gas companies in his region. A graduate of the University of Texas School of Law, he has served his alma mater as an advisor to its Kay Bailey Hutchison Center for Energy, Law & Business. As part of his long career in the industry, Duke Ligon oversaw operations for an oil importing program associated with the White House Energy Policy Office and the federal Oil Policy Committee before and during the days of the global embargo that began in 1973.

The embargo came about after members of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) chose to retaliate for the United States’ support of Israel during the Arab-Israeli War. OPEC’s membership consisted then, as it does now, of a number of the oil-exporting nations of the Middle East. In addition to forbidding petroleum exports to the United States, OPEC members banned countries such as the Netherlands, which had also given support to Israel, from receiving their oil supplies. In addition to these prohibitions, exporters elected to introduce cuts in the amount of oil they produced for world markets.

By that time, the American economy had become increasingly dependent upon the importation of foreign-produced petroleum products, and the embargo only exacerbated that situation. By the time the embargo ended in early 1974, American gas prices had more than doubled.